HELLO  |    the more you know about us, the happier we are
September 2019 back to news
 
OK
 
Bikes
12.14.05
Photo 1 Photo 2
Shortest chainstays on the market
I wouldn’t be typing any of this, however, if those short chainstays didn’t have an impact out on the trail. They do.
Shortest chainstays on the market
I wouldn’t be typing any of this, however, if those short chainstays didn’t have an impact out on the trail. They do.
Atlas RC
The Atlas impresses. If you race cross country or just trail ride somewhere tight and technical, the Atlas RC should be on your short list.
Big buzz
The Atlas is an XC geek’s dream machine | THE BIG BUZZ ABOUT DEVINCI’S NEW BIG- wheeled, cross-country machine has been—wait for it—its tiny chainstays. I know, anti-climatic, right? While chainstays probably seem a fairly underwhelming feature to get giddy about, the Atlas’ chainstay length, or lack thereof, truly merits ink. Cross-country bikes should be nimble. Once you add 29-inch wheels to the recipe, however, chainstays and wheelbase grow. The Atlas, however, sports 16.9-inch chainstays, which are positively stubby for a 29er.

I wouldn’t be typing any of this, however, if those short chainstays didn’t have an impact out on the trail. They do. The Atlas is an XC geek’s dream machine—imagine all of the flickability and pinpoint handling of the best 26-inch XC bike married to the rock-garden-smothering traits of a 29er. It’s a hell of a combination.

The big wheels’ decreased angle of attack makes log-overs ridiculously easy to hurdle, but there’s no denying that the Atlas’ rear suspension also deserves its share of the limelight. The bike is configured around Dave Weagle’s Split Pivot rear suspension. The hype on Split Pivot is that it reduces both pedaling- and braking- induced shock compression—in other words, less suspension bobbing under pedaling loads and less suspension stiffening during braking.

While I’ve ridden plenty of bikes with firmer pedaling platforms, the Split Pivot system makes for a capable climbing machine that boasts a nice balance of traction and efficiency. Even with the Fox RP2 locked out, the rear wheel tracks beautifully over small chatter. The Atlas also sports a geometry-tweaking flip-chip, allowing you to run the bike in either steep—71.2 head and 72.8 seat angle or slack—70.6 head and 72.2 seat angle—setting.

What kind of riders might be less thrilled than I by this bike? With its 43.5-inch wheelbase—and that’s on a size large—the Devinci doesn’t boast that land-yacht stability that you experience on 29ers with sprawling wheelbases, but hey, you give up one trait in order to gain another. Similarly, weight-conscious types aren’t exactly going to be bowled over by the bike’s 28-pound weight sans pedals. Nor is there an easy way to cleave off the pounds since the kit—which includes a Fox 32 Float RL fork, Easton XC wheelset and largely SRAM X7/X9 drivetrain—is fairly light on its own. On the whole, however, the Atlas impresses. If you race cross country or just trail ride somewhere tight and technical, the Atlas RC should be on your short list.

—VERNON FELTON
useful link(s)



subscribe to the devinci
newsletter and become
a privilege member


You TubeTwitterFacebook